Personification of Love

Personification of Love

Personification of Love

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While the following poem was originally written for my wife, who was born in Crystal Lake (…

born in a lake of crystals), “she” represents every single woman, mother, girl, and grandma to ever exist on planet earth. She is a force poignantly placed as the counterpoint to man.

She is the support and strength of spirit and fortune in his life. He is the comfort and stability in hers.

Relationships can often be taken for granted. Don't get caught receiving without giving. wise, set boundaries for giving without receiving. Hard work and appreciation are bedrocks in a beautiful union.

Set yourself aside and spend time investing in the other. They are there for you. Now it's time for you to do the same for them. Recognize all that they give. Give back consciously, with your heart wide open.

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I love a beauty born in a lake of crystals.Her earthy eyes are emeralds forged with fiery desire.Her laugh is the universe.

She is living elation.

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Her voice channels the melody of Heaven.God's gift and artistry,everything about her is perfect.

She is the meaning of life.

When she is around, the day glows with magical light.Everyone awakens as she dances into their lives–twirling free from limitations

and reviving joy in the heart of humanity.

I dare not mention the sensual curves that outline her bodyfor fear of breaking the internet.Know this, though, that she is more magnificent

than any Greek goddess preserved in polished stone.

Equally fierce, she is an Amazon warrior,a survivor.She grows stronger every single day,

moving in upward spirals that radiate worldwide.

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She is the bloomed flower floating in a sea of seeds,sitting delicately under a quiet spotlight;shy, but wanting a friend

with whom she'll share all her soul and infinite passion.

I wish to be that counterpart,the one who never leavesher heart untended–

a blended creation of something new.

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I'm seven months married, but have been with my wife for seven years in total. We were made for each other, intimately connected in every way. While our relationship is strong, that doesn't mean it's always flourishing.

Regardless of ups and down, we have an understanding. We talk, we share time together, we express our love for each other. Even on our worst day, it's better than any moment without her.

Relationships take time and effort. Be true to yourself as to whether you are ready for the give and take of another's energy field. You'll share your life. You'll have to be selfless. You'll have to be honest with your partner and yourself.

It's important to always see your loved one from a fresh perspective. Recognize their unique perspective and consciousness. Let them live their life freely. Support them. Learn from them and encourage their best.

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It's important to get up and moving. Don't get couch-locked. Get the house. Do something, anything. It doesn't have to cost money. It can be a walk or a talk. Listen to music. Play a game. Go explore.

Anything can be a date if you want it to be. Just labeling an afternoon a “date” will bring a special quality to the time spent together. Sharing experiences is a must for a healthy relationship.

So, if you're going to relax, you better make that a relaxing date. Relax to the utmost potential, but do it together.

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Something that makes a relationship more fun is having a special connection with your partner. Do you do anything to connect with your partner? What do you enjoy doing together?

Leave little notes. Hide messages. Read a book together. Get creative. Get athletic. Get educated. Your thing doesn't have to be the same all the time. You can switch it anytime you want. Just do something to connect in small ways.

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Talk openly and honestly. It's important to feel free to show your humanity. Acting too cool will create a barrier of insecurity or the illusion of arrogance. It really comes down to being completely comfortable with yourself. If you don't know who you are, the relationship is going to reveal some pretty unique things about you.

It's important to have a good grasp on your true self before entering into a relationship. If you are living behind a mask, one of two things will ly happen. First, the mask will eventually come off. The person beneath might not be what the other person was looking for. Worse, you might create another mask or a mask for your partner, further hiding from the ego.

Depending on how close you want to become to the other, you may want to tell them our secrets. Being completely transparent is liberating. Sometimes we can barely handle our own demons. When we trust and allow other to peer in on our lives, it can lessen the burden and remove guilt from even the darkest of places.

Source: https://pairedlife.com/relationships/Personification-of-Love

Examples of Personification

Personification of Love

Everyone knows what a person is, but do you know what personification is? Personification is a type of metaphor and a common literary tool. It is when you assign the qualities of a person to something that isn't human or that isn't even alive, such as nature or household items. Work through these personification examples to see how well you understand the concept. 

Suffering green car needing TLC

Personification is often found in literature and poetry to help human readers relate to non-human subjects. 

Two Sunflowers Move Into the Yellow Room by Nancy Willard

In this poem, the sunflowers are talking to the famous poet William Blake. They are tired of being outside and tell him that they want to be moved. We know that sunflowers cannot be tired or talk, so Willard uses personification to give them these attributes.

“Ah, William, we're weary of weather,’ said the sunflowers, shining with dew. ‘Our traveling habits have tired us.

Can you give us a room with a view?’ They arranged themselves at the window and counted the steps of the sun, and they both took root in the carpet where the topaz tortoises run.”

I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud by William Wordsworth

This poem brings the beauty and tranquility of nature to life. The daffodils are personified as a crowd of people dancing, while Wordsworth floats a cloud enjoying the show.

“I wandered lonely as a cloud

that floats on high o'er vales and hills,

When all at once I saw a crowd,

A host, of golden daffodils;

Beside the lake, beneath the trees,

Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

Continuous as the stars that shine

And twinkle on the milky way,

They stretched in never-ending line

Along the margin of a bay:

Ten thousand saw I at a glance,

Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.”

Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

William Shakespeare uses personification throughout Romeo and Juliet. One example is in Act 2 when Friar Lawrence is picking flowers for his various potions. 

He says:

“The grey-ey'd morn smiles on the frowning night, Check'ring the Eastern clouds with streaks of light.”

In describing the morning as smiling at the night, he is personifying the morning and establishing a romantic setting for Romeo and Juliet's love to unfold.

The following sentences use the personification technique. See if you can identify which part of the word or phrase is the personification. The answers are in the section immediately following the examples. 

Personification Examples 1 Through 25

Can you identify what is being personified in each sentence and what human trait or ability it’s being given?

1. The stars danced playfully in the moonlit sky.

2. The run-down house appeared depressed.

3. The first rays of morning tiptoed through the meadow.

4. She did not realize that opportunity was knocking at her door.

5. He did not realize that his last chance was walking out the door.

6. The bees played hide and seek with the flowers as they buzzed from one to another.

7. The wind howled its mighty objection.

8. The snow swaddled the earth a mother would her infant child.

9. The river swallowed the earth as the water continued to rise higher and higher.

10. Time flew and before we knew it, it was time for me to go home.

11. The ocean waves lashed out at the boat, and the storm continued to brew.

12. My computer throws a fit every time I try to use it.

13. The thunder grumbled an old man.

14. The flowers waltzed in the gentle breeze.

15. Her life passed her by.

16. The sun glared down at me from the sky.

17. The moon winked at me through the clouds above.

18. The wind sang through the meadow.

19. The car was suffering and was in need of some TLC.

20. At precisely 6:30 AM, my alarm clock sprang to life.

21. The window panes were talking as the wind blew through them.

22. The ocean danced in the moonlight.

23. The words appeared to leap off of the paper as she read the story.

24. The phone awakened with a mighty ring.

25. The funeral raced by me in a blur.

Examples 1 Through 25 Answers

Did you identify the personification in the examples above? The human trait assigned to the subject and the subject of the personification are in bold here. 

1. The stars dancedplayfully in the moonlit sky.

2. The run-down house appeared depressed.

3. The first rays of morning tiptoed through the meadow.

4. She did not realize that opportunity was knocking at her door.

5. He did not realize that his last chance was walking out the door.

6. The bees played hide and seek with the flowers as they buzzed from one to another.

7. The wind howled its mighty objection.

8. The snow swaddled the earth a mother would her infant child.

9. The river swallowed the earth as the water continued to rise higher and higher.

10. Time flew and before we knew it, it was time for me to go home.

11. The ocean waves lashed out at the boat, and the storm continued to brew.

12. My computer throws a fit every time I try to use it.

13. The thunder grumbled an old man.

14. The flowers waltzed in the gentle breeze.

15. Her life wandered past.

16. The sun glared down at me from the sky.

17. The moon winked at me through the clouds above.

18. The wind sang through the meadow.

19. The car was suffering and was in need of some TLC.

20. At precisely 6:30 AM, my alarm clock sprang to life.

21. The window panes were talking as the wind blew through them.

22. The ocean danced in the moonlight.

23. The words leapt off of the paper as she read the story.

24. The phone awakened with a mighty ring.

25. The funeral raced by me in a blur.

Personification Examples 26 Through 50

Hopefully the first 25 examples gave you some confidence in your ability to spot personification. See if you can find the personification in these next 25 questions. 

26. While making my way to my car, it appeared to smile at me mischievously.

27. The car, painted lime green, raced by screaming for attention.

28. The butterflies in the meadow seemed to two-step with one another.

29. The waffle jumped up the toaster.

30.The popcorn leapt the bowl.

31. When the DVD went on sale, it flew off the shelves.

32. I tripped because the curb jumped out in front of me.

33. Time creeps up on you.

34. The news took me by surprise.

35. The fire ran wild.

36. The thunder yelled angrily in the distance.

37. The tornado ran through town without a care.

38. The door protested as it opened slowly.

39. The evil tree was lurking in the shadows.

40. The tree branch moaned as I swung from it.

41. Time marches to the beat of its own drum.

42. The storm attacked the town with great rage.

43. My life came screeching to a halt.

44. The baseball screamed all the way into the outfield.

45. The blizzard swallowed the town.

46. The tsunami raced towards the coastline.

47. The avalanche devoured everything in its path.

48. The pistol glared at me from its holster.

49. The car beckoned me from across the showroom.

50. I could hear Hawaii calling my name.

Examples 26 Through 50 Answers

The subject of the personification and the human characteristic it was assigned are both in bold here. How many did you get right this time?

26. While making my way to my car, it smiled at me mischievously.

27. The car, painted lime green, raced by screaming for attention.

28. The butterflies in the meadow seemed to two-step with one another.

29. The waffle jumped up the toaster.

30. The popcorn leapt the bowl.

31. When the DVD went on sale, it flew off the shelves.

32. I tripped because the curb jumped out in front of me.

33. Time creeps up on you.

34. The news vied for my attention.

35. The fire ran wild.

36. The thunder yelled angrily in the distance.

37. The tornado ran through town without a care.

38. The door protested as it opened slowly.

39. The evil tree was lurking in the shadows.

40. The tree branch moaned as I swung from it.

41. Time marches to the beat of its own drum.

42. The storm attacked the town with great rage.

43. My life came screeching to a halt.

44. The baseball screamed all the way into the outfield.

45. The blizzard swallowed the town.

46. The tsunami raced towards the coastline.

47. The avalanche devoured everything in its path.

48. The pistol glared at me from its holster.

49. The car beckoned me from across the showroom.

50. I could hear Hawaii calling my name.

Why Use Personification?

There are many reasons for using personification. It can be used as a method of describing something so that others can more easily understand it. It can be used to emphasize a point. It can be used to help paint a picture in your mind. You may even use personification without knowing it.

Personification vs. Anthropomorphism

There is often confusion between personification and anthropomorphism. While they are similar, this is a distinct difference. 

Personification means:

“Giving an object or animal human characteristics to create interesting imagery.”

An example of personification would be in the nursery rhyme “Hey Diddle Diddle” where “the little dog laughed to see such fun.”

Anthropomorphism means:

“Making an object or animal act and look they are human.”

An example of anthropomorphism is Peter Rabbit, a bunny who wears a coat and talks.

Purpose of Personification

As seen by the examples above, personification is used to assign human qualities to things that are not human, but it does not make them behave a human.

The purpose of this figurative language is to bring inanimate things to life to better explain them. Writers often use personification to make their writing more vivid and to have the reader understand the object or animal in a better way.

Keep having fun with this literary device by checking out humorous examples of personification in poetry.

Source: https://examples.yourdictionary.com/examples-of-personification.html

Personification Examples and Definition

Personification of Love

As a literary device, personification is the projection of characteristics that normally belong only to humans onto inanimate objects, animals, deities, or forces of nature. These characteristics can include verbs of actions that only humans do or adjectives that describe a human condition.

The characteristics can also be emotions, feelings, or motives given to objects incapable of thought. For example, if someone said, “the trees whispered their discontent,” this would personify the trees both as able to whisper and of feeling unhappy.

Personification is also sometimes referred to as anthropomorphism when it is used to give human feelings and actions to animals.

Personification can also mean the embodiment of an abstract idea or quality. This definition of personification can extend even to humans. For example, a person can be said to personify the patriotism of his country or the ambition of her company. We could say, “She is the personification of the grit and determination needed to make this start-up work.”

Examples of Personification from Common Speech

We use many examples of personification in every day speech. Some characteristics have become quite common to attribute to certain things, such as the following:

  • Justice is blind
  • Her heart skipped a beat
  • The sun smiled down on them
  • The stars winked
  • The party died down
  • The city never sleeps
  • The wind howled
  • The iron gates looked down at them cruelly
  • The house sighed
  • The car sputtered and coughed before starting

Significance of Personification in Literature

Personification and anthropomorphism has been a part of storytelling for thousands of years, evident in Aesop’s Fables and fairy tales from many different cultures. Gods in myths and legends are often given human qualities even though they are distinctly not human. This makes them examples of personification.

Personification has remained popular throughout the centuries, given that it can add aesthetic qualities to a work and provide a way for authors to describe inanimate objects.

It also inserts more meaning into the inexplicable things forces of nature.

Often the use of personification also helps to show a character’s own attitudes toward a certain thing if they project or ascribe their own feelings onto an inanimate object.

Anthropomorphism is also still very popular, especially in stories for children and the fable genre. It is also sometimes used in satirical works, such as George Orwell’s Animal Farm, and graphic novels, such as Art Spiegelman’s Maus.

Example #1

TITANIA: No night is now with hymn or carol blessed.Therefore the moon, the governess of floods,Pale in her anger, washes all the air,

That rheumatic diseases do abound.

(A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare)

In this example of personification, Shakespeare uses the concept of the moon as a character. The moon is feminized (as often it is in literature, if given a gender) and said to be a governess of floods.

The color of the moon lends to the depiction of “her anger” and she is said to cause more disease to spread due to her displeasure.

Shakespeare thus gives the moon new descriptive qualities, emotions, and motivation.

Example #2

Her heart was divided between concern for her sister, and resentment against all the others.

(Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen)

In this excerpt from Pride and Prejudice, Jane Austen writes about a heart that feels concern and resentment. The heart in question is of the character Elizabeth. It’s clear that Elizabeth is the one divided between concern for her sister Jane and resentment for the others, yet Austen personifies Elizabeth’s heart to have these feelings to add some poetic sensibility to the sentence.

Example #3

Something there is that doesn’t love a wall,That sends the frozen-ground-swell under it,And spills the upper boulders in the sun,

And makes gaps even two can pass abreast.

(“Mending Wall” by Robert Frost)

Robert Frost’s poem “Mending Wall” contains the famous line “Good fences make good neighbors.

” This excerpt is from the beginning of the poem, and sets up a contrast between the neighbors who keep fixing the wall between them and the “something” that doesn’t love this wall.

Though Frost never specifies what it is that “doesn’t love a wall,” we can take it to mean that nature revolts against artificial separations and borders. Winter cold causes the wall to break in different places, and Frost gives winter the motivation for doing this.

Example #4

The Western States nervous under the beginning change.Texas and Oklahoma, Kansas and Arkansas, New Mexico,Arizona, California. A single family moved from the land.Pa borrowed money from the bank, and now the bank wantsthe land.

The land company–that’s the bank when it has land–wants tractors, not families on the land. Is a tractor bad? Isthe power that turns the long furrows wrong? If this tractorwere ours it would be good–not mine, but ours.

If our tractorturned the long furrows of our land, it would be good.Not my land, but ours. We could love that tractor then aswe have loved this land when it was ours. But the tractordoes two things–it turns the land and turns us off the land.

There is little difference between this tractor and a tank.The people are driven, intimidated, hurt by both. We must think

about this.

(The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck)

John Steinbeck’s classic The Grapes of Wrath is set during the Dust Bowl era of the 1930s. This personification example begins with the “Western States” being nervous.

Of course the states themselves did not feel anxiety, but the people in those states started to feel nervous about the diminishing returns from the land.

Bankers started repossessing land, and thus Steinbeck personifies the banks to want the land.

Example #5

When death comes the hungry bear in autumn;

when death comes and takes all the bright coins from his purse

to buy me, and snaps the purse shut…

I want to step through the door full of curiosity, wondering:
what is it going to be , that cottage of darkness?

(“When Death Comes” by Mary Oliver)

Mary Oliver’s poem “When Death Comes” uses several different ways to describe death. She begins here with the image of death as a hungry bear.

Then Oliver gives death the human characteristics of having money and wanting to make a purchase, thereby personifying it. Thus death is full of desire in this poem.

Oliver uses this concept to contrast her own desire to live her life as fully as possible before death comes for her.

Example #6

But, on one side of the portal, and rooted almost at the threshold, was a wild rose-bush, covered, in this month of June, with its delicate gems, which might be imagined to offer their fragrance and fragile beauty to the prisoner as he went in, and to the condemned criminal as he came forth to his doom, in token that the deep heart of Nature could pity and be kind to him.

(The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne)

In this excerpt from Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, there is a juxtaposition between the wild rose-bush and its location, namely the prison.

The rose-bush is “delicate” and has “fragile beauty,” whereas the “condemned criminal” is going “forth to his doom.

” Hawthorne uses personification to say that the rose-bush offers its fragrance, and thus a measure of its innocence, to the prisoner. He goes on to personify Nature as full of both kindness and pity.

Test Your Knowledge of Personification

1. Choose the correct personification definition:

A. The act of literally making something human.
B. A person who strives to be the best he or she can be.
C. A literary device which gives human qualities to nonhuman things.

Answer to Question #1Show
Answer: C is the correct answer.

2. Which of these lines from Shakespeare’s Sonnet 18 contains personification?

A. Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?
B. Nor shall death brag thou wander’st in his shade…
C. So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see…

Answer to Question #2Show
Answer: In B, Shakespeare personifies death as being able to brag, and thus this is the correct answer.

3. Which of the parts of this excerpt from Mary Oliver’s “Wild Geese” make it an example of personification?

Whoever you are, no matter how lonely,
the world offers itself to your imagination

A. Whoever you are
B. No matter how lonely
C. The world offers itself
D. To your imagination

Answer to Question #3Show
Answer: C is the correct answer.

Source: http://www.literarydevices.com/personification/

10 Personification Examples in Poetry, Literature, and More

Personification of Love

Personification is an important literary device—as a form of metaphor, personification compares two things quickly and efficiently, often in a poetic fashion. But what is it?

In this guide, we’ll discuss what personification is, what it does, and why so many writers use it, as well as a whole bunch of examples to help you get accustomed to identifying personification when you see it.

This isn't quite personification, but it is cute.

What Is Personification?

Personification is pretty simple, but before we can get into what it is, we need to discuss metaphors.

Personification is a form of metaphor, a literary device comparing two things by applying the qualities of one thing to another. One famous example is the Walt Whitman line, “And your very flesh shall be a great poem.

” Whitman isn’t suggesting that your flesh is literally a poem—that would be both impossible and uncomfortable—but rather that your entire self is a work of art.

Within the context of the Leaves of Grass preface, where this quote comes from, the quote means that, through love and patience and living with meaning and purpose, your entire self will have meaning and purpose, just as a poem does.

Though Whitman’s quote is a metaphor, it’s not personification. Personification is a more specific type of metaphor in which something that is not human is given human traits. Whitman’s quote compares flesh, something human, to a poem, something inhuman, meaning it’s not personification.

Instead, personification will look something this quote from John Keats’ “To Autumn”:

“Conspiring with him how to load and bless
With fruit the vines that round the thatch-eves run.”

Here, the thing doing the conspiring is autumn, and ‘him’ is the maturing sun. Neither of these things can conspire—autumn is a season, and the sun is a star—but for the purpose of illustrating how perfect the season is, Keats suggests that they can.

In this example, Keats gives both autumn and the sun the human ability to conspire. That doesn’t mean that Keats wants you to picture the sun and autumn literally whispering in one another’s ears; he’s suggesting harmony and a natural order of things.

As the sun matures (another thing it isn’t technically doing, at least not in this poem) into the later stages of the year, the fruit on the vines begins to ripen just in time for the harvest.

As the sun moves further from the earth and the weather grows colder, the season switches to autumn, as if the two were consciously working together. Hence, the idea of conspiring.

As you can see, personification can add a dramatic and more evocative flair to writing.

If Keats’ poem had simply read, “The sun gets further away from the earth as the season changes to autumn, just in time for the fruit to ripen,” it wouldn't feel particularly inspiring or interesting.

But when he suggests that the sun and autumn are conspiring, we get a much more vivid, memorable picture of what the seasons are .

This isn't personification either.

Examples of Personification

Keats is just one writer using personification—there are lots of different ways to use this literary device to great effect. You don’t even need to be world-renowned Romantic poet to use it!

Basic Examples of Personification

Since personification is just giving something that isn’t human the characteristics of a human, it’s very simple to do! Check out these examples:

The stars winked in the night sky.

Stars, having no eyes, cannot wink. But when you see this phrase, you know that they’re twinkling.

The bridge stretched over the interstate.

A bridge can’t stretch, but from this phrase, we get the mental image of it being long and gracefully curved.

The cave mouth yawned.

A mouth can yawn, but a cave mouth cannot. Still, we get the mental image of the cave mouth stretched wide.

The smell of baking muffins welcomed us inside.

A smell can’t welcome, but we can still understand that the narrator of this sentence feels welcomed by the homey smell.

Poetry Examples of Personification

We often encounter figurative language personification in poetry, where a few words have to carry a lot of meaning. Some of the most famous examples in poetry are:

“Because I could not stop for Death –He kindly stopped for me – The Carriage held but just Ourselves –  And Immortality.”

– “Because I could not stop for Death” by Emily Dickinson

In this poem, Death is personified as a person driving a carriage. Within the confines of this poem, Death may in fact be a person; but Dickinson isn’t writing about a literal event that happened to her. She’s using her relationship with Death figuratively, illustrating how Death goes about its business with little regard for humanity’s work and leisure.

“BlackberriesBig as the ball of my thumb, and dumb as eyesEbon in the hedges, fatWith blue-red juices. These they squander on my fingers.I had not asked for such a blood sisterhood; they must love me.They accommodate themselves to my milkbottle, flattening their sides.”

– “Blackberrying” by Sylvia Plath

Plath makes a direct comparison between blackberries and humans—she says blackberries, eyes, are 'dumb,' in that they cannot speak. But we also know that they can’t squander, they can’t be a sisterhood, and they can’t love or accommodate themselves.

Plath isn’t trying to tell us that these are magic blackberries with all those traits. She’s using personification to illustrate her relationship with these blackberries, demonstrating a unique bond with them.

Even without the context of the whole poem, Plath’s use of personification shows us that these blackberries aren’t just fruit to her.

Literary Examples of Personification

Poets aren’t the only writers using personification—it’s also valuable for prose writers! Check out these famous examples from literature:

“[The eyes of TJ Eckleburg] look no face, but, instead, from a pair of enormous yellow spectacles which pass over a nonexistent nose.

Evidently some wild wag of an oculist set them there to fatten his practice in the borough of Queens, and then sank down himself into eternal blindness or forgot them and moved away.

But his eyes, dimmed a little by many paintless days under sun and rain, brood on over the solemn dumping ground….”

– The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

If these eyes were attached to a human being, they might brood as an extension of the human. But the eyes of TJ Eckleburg are painted on a billboard, not attached to a human face.

It’s impossible for them to brood, as they don’t have emotions.

However, this quote demonstrates the mood that the eyes cast over the valley; it’s dark and dreary, and the way that Fitzgerald characterizes these painted eyes reflects that.

“There is something subversive about this garden of Serena’s, a sense of buried things bursting upwards, wordlessly, into the light, as if to point, to say: Whatever is silenced will clamour to be heard, though silently.

[…] Light pours down upon it from the sun, true, but also heat rises, from the flowers themselves, you can feel it: holding your hand an inch above an arm, a shoulder. It breathes, in the warmth, breathing itself in.

”  

– The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

This paragraph has a couple of instances of personification. Buried things don’t really burst upward—they grow, but to ‘burst’ is to move suddenly, which is something that these plants don’t do.

wise, Atwood says that the heat breathes.

Because heat doesn’t have lungs, it can’t breathe, but it’s clear that Atwood is giving everything in Serena’s garden a sense of life so that even the heat has vitality.

Pop Culture Examples of Personification

You don’t have to look to books you’ve read in school to find personification, either! Everything from TV shows to music to video games can contain personification, such as these examples:

Inside Out

Though everything that happens in the movie Inside Out can be read to be happening literally—it’s a fantasy movie!—it’s also a form of metaphor.

We know that in real life our emotions aren’t little humanoid figures running around pulling levers, but giving emotions joy and sadness human characteristics encourages viewers to appreciate their complexity.

Sadness isn’t bad, and joy isn’t always good—when we give them human traits, we see that any emotion can mean multiple things!

“You try to scream but terror takes the sound before you make itYou start to freeze as horror looks you right between the eyesYou're paralyzed'Cause this is thriller, thriller nightAnd no one's gonna save you from the beast about to strike.”

– “Thriller” by Michael Jackson

There are a few examples of personification in this song—in just this verse, terror “takes the sound” and horror “looks you right between the eyes.” Logically, we know that emotions can't take or look at anything.

But using that kind of language to describe fear gives it an agency that infuses this song with energy. It's not difficult to understand why this works so well; if you've ever been afraid, you know how it can affect the way your body feels, sometimes paralyzing you.

That's what Jackson is tapping into in this song: the sense that fear can trap you and make you feel you're control.

What’s Next?

Personification is just one of many literary devices at your disposal. Check out this list of literary devices and how they're used for a whole bunch more!

Want to know more about how the Valley of Ashes is constructed in The Great Gatsby? Learn more from this post all about how the Valley of Ashes works as a symbol!

Understanding how personification works can help you in AP literature—just this reading list for AP lit students!

What kind of man so s being described by his mother as the personification of “the beast” that he adopts it as his own nickname? Learn more about the strange life and times of Aleister Crowley with this article.

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Romeo and Juliet Personification

Personification of Love

Personification is a figure of speech in which inanimate objects and ideas are given human attributes.

By attributing human- characteristics to inanimate things, a personification offers an entirely new perspective of evaluating and understanding the inanimate world. Once the non-living things are bought to life, the readers can relate to them easily.

Playwrights use personification to emphasize a certain point or to make a particular description more vivid to the readers that it can be done otherwise.

In “Romeo and Juliet”, personifications have been used to convey the depth of certain abiding emotions such as love, sadness, desire or to add a life- element to natural occurrences such as morning, night and the most dreaded of all natural phenomena, death. Some of the instances of personification from the play are highlighted below:

Example #1

“Alas that love, so gentle in his view,
Should be so tyrannous and rough in proof!”

(I. i. 174-175)

This quote is delivered by Benvolio while he is conversing with Romeo. In this instance, love is personified as a person who seems gentle and harmless.

However, when one has an encounter with love, as an individual, comes across as a cold and rough tyrant who merely exacerbates one’s loneliness and sadness.

The element of personification in this example is used to emphasize the point that the emotional experience of love which serves as a strong contrast to merely encountering an abstract or theoretical concept of love.

Example #2

“Alas that love, whose view is muffled still,
Should without eyes see pathways to his will!”

(I. i. 176-177)

This particular quote is spoken by Romeo while he is expressing the fact that falling in love is not a conscious choice.

On the contrary, love is an emotion that takes a person by surprise, and once an individual is under its spell, he or she cannot disengage themselves from it.

In order to make his premise clear, Romeo personifies love as an impartial living agent who despite being blind, is capable of persuasively lure a person in his trap.

Example #3

 “Earth hath swallowed all my hopes but she;
She’s the hopeful lady of my earth.”

(I. ii. 14-15)

Lord Capulet uses the above statement to convey the degree to which he cherishes his daughter Juliet and to emphasize how precious she is.

While addressing Paris, Lord Capulet personifies earth as a living entity that has swallowed all of his children except Juliet.

This particular personification is meant to highlight that Lord Capulet’s children were dead and buried at some point. Juliet is the only child who was able to escape the claws of death.

Example #4

“When well-appareled April on the heel
Of limping winter treads, even such delight”

(I. ii. 27-28)

In these particular lines, the month of April is personified as a well-appareled individual that lightly steps on the heels of winter to replace it and bid the frosty season goodbye.

This personification of April as a person is meant to emphasize the joy that young men feel when encountering beautiful young girls.

The climatic change from winter to spring highlights the onset of new love and the joy, enthusiasm and the elated sense of anticipation that accompanies with its arrival.

Example #5

“Now old desire doth in his deathbed lie…”

(II. Chorus)

In this particular quote, the chorus personifies desire as an old confused individual lying on his deathbed and experiencing the last phase of his life.

This personification of desire is meant to highlight that of Romeo’s first superficial love for Rosaline is fading.

By emphasizing that Romeo’s infatuation with Rosaline has almost come to an end, the chorus is highlighting the end of a significant chapter in Romeo’s life. This ending serves as a prelude to new beginnings for Romeo.

Example #6

“And young affection gapes to be his heir.”

(II. Chorus)

In this statement made by the chorus, affection is personified as a living being and a young heir to the old desire.

 This personification implies that Romeo’s newfound affection for Juliet is gradually replacing his old obsession over Rosaline.

The representation of affection as a young heir to desire signifies that once desire originates, it seldom disintegrates. In effect, desire paves the way for a legacy of future wishes.

Example #7

“To be consorted with the humorous night.”

(II. ii. 34)

In the statement above made by Benvolio, the night is personified as Romeo’s close confidante.

While referring to Romeo’s melancholic brooding over Rosaline, Benvolio maintains that it seems as if Romeo has formed a strong, inextricable bond with the dark and gloomy night.

This personification highlights Romeo’s reluctance to disengage himself from any thoughts of Rosaline. By emphasizing that the night is Romeo’s abiding friend, Benvolio is asserting that the night serves to complement Romeo’s sad mood and vice versa.

Example #8

“By love, that first did prompt me to inquire.
He lent me counsel, and I lent him eyes.”

(II. ii. 85-86)

In this quote, Romeo personifies love as a strong and influential person who has a remarkable ability to maneuver people. This graphic personification of love highlights that falling in love is an unintended decision.

He also adds that one has a minimal choice when it comes to choosing one’s beloved.

By stating that love is the one who motivates and counsels Romeo to fall in love, Romeo is emphasizing that when it comes to matters of the heart, love has a tendency to act as an unchosen guide.

Example #9

“The gray-eyed morn smiles on the frowning night,
Check’ring the eastern clouds with streaks of light…”

(II. iii. 1-2)

Stated by Friar Lawrence, this particular quote presents dawn as a gray-eyed individual who jovially replaces the dark and frowning night and casts a series of soft, early morning rays on the clouds. This beautifully vivid personification of dawn serves to highlight the smooth and natural transition of night to early hours of the morning.

Example #10

“Care keeps his watch in every old man’s eye,
And, where care lodges, sleep will never lie…”

(II. iii. 37-38)

In this particular verse, Friar Lawrence maintains that care afflicts all old men and where care resides, one can seldom experience a peaceful sleep. Through this personification of care as an uninvited guest that resides in old people’s minds, Friar Lawrence is trying to make Romeo realize that if he gives into worry, he will be condemned to experience a series of sleepless nights.

Source: https://literarydevices.net/romeo-and-juliet-personification/

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